Wednesday, June 3, 2009

Time for a Makeover?

As anyone can see from the date of my last entry, I've been trying my best to ignore my blog. But ignoring it hasn't made it go away. Day after day, it sits untouched as a monument to my negligence. I've contemplated letting it go altogether, but despite my apparent apathy, I can't seem to do it. Every time I think about it, separation anxiety seizes my innermost being. How can you be so attached to something that you obviously don't seem to care about?

I think it's time for a makeover. A lot of my "blogger's block" stems from the fact that I feel locked in to writing about writing. Maybe that's my problem. I am not just a freelance writer and editor (especially lately!). I am a child of God, a wife, a mom, a home-educator, a daughter, a sister, a cook, a maid, a... well, I think you get it. I need to revamp, redesign, reinvent, and a bunch of other re- words that I can't seem to think of right now.

This will take some brainstorming, so stay tuned... Hopefully, it won't take me another two months to figure this out...

Sunday, March 29, 2009

A Girl Can Dream, Can't She?

Ever thought about your dream writers' conference? If money wasn't an issue, I think I'd like to attend the Maui Writer's Conference.

OK, besides the obvious -- location, location, location! -- this is one sweet conference. It's full to the brim with editors from well-respected houses, high-powered agents and famous authors. A networker's paradise, smack dab in the middle of, you guessed it, paradise!

C'mon, a girl can dream can't she?

Thursday, March 5, 2009

Follow the Drinking Gourd

A few weeks ago, my kids and I visited the Indianapolis Children's Museum to check out the new LEGO exhibit. In my 9-year-old son's words, "It was awesome!" While there we also experienced another "awesome" thing -- an extremely innovative use of children's literature. The museum's plantetarium featured a show entitled Follow the Drinking Gourd, based on the children's book by Jeanette Winter. In her book, Winter illustrated the words to a folk song that was used to show slaves the way to the Underground Railroad and eventually, to freedom. The slaves would look for the Big Dipper, aka The Drinking Gourd, in the night sky to guide them north to Canada.

After viewing the program, my kids and I were inspired to learn more about the Underground Railroad and the constellations. What a great way to use children's literature to educate and spur a love of learning!

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Death by Blogging?

A Post a Day
I'm slipping into my old habits again. We're 27 days into the New Year, and this is only my second blog entry of the month. Maybe I'm just not cut out for the whole blogging thing. There's just not enough knowledge in this little pea-brain of mine to impart to the rest of the writing world out there.

And now, I've found a perfect excuse to support my lackadaisical blogging habits -- blogging could lead to death. Seriously. Just check out the following news:

Two weeks ago in North Lauderdale, Fla., funeral services were held for Russell Shaw, a prolific blogger on technology subjects who died at 60 of a heart attack. In December, another tech blogger, Marc Orchant, died at 50 of a massive coronary. A third, Om Malik, 41, survived a heart attack in December.
Other bloggers complain of weight loss or gain, sleep disorders, exhaustion and other maladies born of the nonstop strain of producing for a news and information cycle that is as always-on as the Internet.
To be sure, there is no official diagnosis of death by blogging, and the premature demise of two people obviously does not qualify as an epidemic. There is also no certainty that the stress of the work contributed to their deaths. But friends and family of the deceased, and fellow information workers, say those deaths have them thinking about the dangers of their work style.

See? Maybe just blogging occasionally isn't such a bad thing. After all, I like writing, but I wouldn't want to die for it.

Friday, January 2, 2009

Happy New Year 2009!

What will 2009 bring? I'm pondering this question as I sit here munching on Fruit Loops, watching Clifford with my 8-year-old and wondering where 2008 went. Something about Fruit Loops and Clifford makes me feel hopeful and inspired. Maybe it's the 12 grams of sugar. Or maybe it's the fact the Norman Bridwell, author of the Clifford series, is just a regular guy from Kokomo, Indiana. Just "down the road a piece" from where I sit. Here's a bit of Bridwell's story from the Scholastic website:

It was in 1962 while he was working as a freelance filmstrip and slide illustrator and drawing mostly cartoons that Bridwell decided to put together a portfolio of colorful drawings and make the rounds of children's book publishers. Now married, with an infant daughter — Emily — he was hoping to supplement his income with some extra work illustrating books.

Bridwell visited about fifteen publishing houses but there were no assignments to be had, and even worse, seemingly little hope for any in the future. One editor at Harper & Row went so far as to tell Bridwell that his art by itself was just not good enough, and she didn't think anybody would ask him to illustrate a book for them. But amazingly enough, she also made the suggestion that helped bring him the phenomenal success he enjoys today. She advised him to write a story to go along with one of his pictures. She picked out his sketch of a baby girl and a horse-sized bloodhound and casually said, “There might be a story in this,” Bridwell remembers.

He wasted no time in taking her advice, but he did decide to make the bloodhound even bigger and more of an “all-around” dog — much like the dog he had wanted as a little boy, one that he could ride and who would be a fun companion. Bridwell remembers speaking to the editor on a Friday, and “By Monday, I had done this little book about a girl and her dog,” he says.

Now all he needed were names for his characters. “I wanted to call the dog 'Tiny,' but Norma (his wife) said that was boring and suggested 'Clifford' after an imaginary friend from her childhood,” Bridwell says. The little girl's name, however, was easy. Bridwell named her Emily Elizabeth, after his young daughter. He dropped off his drawings and manuscript at Scholastic and tried not to expect anything. Three weeks later the phone rang. Scholastic wanted to publish Clifford the Big Red Dog. At the time, Bridwell couldn't quite believe it. “I said to my wife, 'Now don't count on there being any more. This one is just a fluke. I don't know if there will ever be another one.'” But it was no fluke — so far over 40 Clifford books have been published.
So, take heart, writers, from Bridwell's inspiring story. 2009 may be your year!